Quantcast Demonstration Method - 14504_27

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Demonstration Method Use the demonstration or   “doing”   method to teach  skills.  Demonstrate,  step-by-step,  the procedures in a job task, using the exact physical procedures if possible. While demonstrating, explain the reason for and the significance of each step. To be effective, plan the demonstration so that you will be sure to show the steps in the proper sequence and to include all steps. If you must give the demonstration before a large group or if the trainees might have trouble seeing because of the size of the equipment involved, use enlarged devices or training aids. When practical, allow trainees to repeat the procedure in a “hands on” practice session to reinforce the learning process. By immediately correcting the trainees’  mistakes and reinforcing proper procedures, you can help them learn the task more quickly. The direct demonstration approach is a very effective method of instruction, especially when trainees have the opportunity to repeat the procedures. TECHNIQUES USED IN THE DEMONSTRATION   METHOD.—The  basic method of instruction for teaching skill-type subject matter is the demonstration-performance method of instruction. This method is recommended for teaching a skill because it covers all the necessary steps in an effective learning order. The  demonstration  step  gives  trainees  the opportunity to see and hear the details related to the skill being taught. Those details include the necessary background knowledge, the steps or procedure, the nomenclature,  and  the  safety  precautions.  The repetition step helps the average and slow learners and gives the trainees an additional opportunity to see and hear the skill being taught. The performance step gives all trainees the opportunity to become proficient. In short, this method is recommended because it leaves nothing to chance. For convenience, the techniques for imparting skills are presented in steps, rather than activities. When setting up an instructional plan, understand that you don’t have to follow these steps in the sequence presented; instead choose the steps in the sequence best suited to the needs of the trainees. Although you will  always  include  a  demonstration  step  and  a performance step, you must use judgment in selecting techniques to make the various steps effective. GENERAL  HINTS.—Make every effort to get trainees to observe correct procedures the first time they try a new task. The most effective learning results when trainees use a skill immediately after you have taught it. So as soon as you teach trainees to do a job, have them practice the skill. Teaching  applicable  safety  precautions  is especially important. Teach a safety precaution just before reaching the point in your demonstration where it applies. State the reason for the precaution so that the trainees will understand the need for compliance. Patience is a virtue for any petty officer. If it does not come naturally to you, you must train yourself to be patient.  A  slow  learner  may  never  acquire  the knowledge or skill you are trying to impart if you are impatient. Avoid sarcasm toward a bungler; that person may be trying harder than you suspect. Nothing exhausts the patience of the expert as much as the fumbling attempts of a beginner; however, the instructor must patiently demonstrate and explain until the trainee acquires the needed competence.  “Good instruction” means a more effective crew, and such an asset justifies any amount of patience. If you find that your trainees have not learned what you tried to teach them, do not react as if they disobeyed orders. If trainees do not understand a certain lesson or operation, that could indicate a poor job of teaching. The old saying,  “If the learner hasn’t learned, the teacher hasn’t taught” might apply in some situations. RELATED TECHNIQUES You can use instructional techniques with any of the above methods. These techniques include the use of the lesson summaryoral questioning, and training aids. Lesson Summary The term summary as used here refers to that part of the lesson in which the instructor reviews the material covered. When summarizing, keep in mind two major aims. First, you want to help the trainees identify and organize the subject matter. Second, you want to assist the trainees in understanding and, where necessary, in memorizing the subject matter. Use the following techniques in summarizing a lesson: Introduce the summary properly. Summarize  the  subject  matter  thoroughly.  Plan the summary so that it assists the trainees in organizing 1-17



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