Quantcast MOORING LINES

Share on Google+Share on FacebookShare on LinkedInShare on TwitterShare on DiggShare on Stumble Upon
Custom Search
 
  
 
ACCOMMODATION LADDER Frequently, the accommodation ladder is mistakenly called the gangway. However, gangway actually means the opening in a bulwark or life rail that gives access to a brow or an accommodation ladder. An accommodation ladder (fig. 7-4) consists essentially of an upper and a lower platform connected by a ladder. The lower end is supported, raised, and lowered by a block and tackle (called falls) and is usually suspended from a davit. Brow  is the Navy term for gangplank. Brows are ramps used between ships and between a ship and pier. They may be simply two or three wooden planks fastened together, or they may be elaborate affairs with handrails and wheels at one or both ends to prevent a ship’s motion from unduly affecting the positioning of the brow. MOORING LINES A ship is moored when it’s made fast to a buoy, when it’s between two buoys, when it’s between two anchors, or when it’s secured by lines alongside a pier or another ship. The lines used in mooring a ship alongside a pier are shown in figure 7-5. Well in advance of mooring, the lines should be faked down, fore and aft, each near the chock through which it passes in preparation for passing the line. You will learn about the procedure for faking a line  and  a  description  of  deck  fittings  later  in  this chapter. Rat guards are hinged conical metal shields secured around  mooring  lines.  They  are  used  to  prevent  rats from coming aboard ship. The bowline and forward spring lines prevent the ship from drifting astern. The stern line and after spring lines  prevent  the  ship  from  drifting  forward.  Look  at figure  7-5.  Here,  lines  1,  3,  and  5  are  called  forward lines;  lines  2,  4,  and  6  are  called  after lines.  When secured,  these  lines  tend  to  breast  the  ship  in.  The forward and after spring lines are used to prevent the ship from drifting forward or aft. NOTE The  various  types  of  line  and  wire  rope  are discussed  in  the  “Marlinespike  Seamanship” section of this chapter. Teamwork  is  essential  in  carrying  out  the mooring  operation.  Lines  must  not  be  kinked  or fouled. Keep control of the lines and avoid dipping them into  the  water.  Remember,  observe  all  safety precautions! If the ship is to remain moored for a long period, lines are doubled up and bound together with marline hitches, and rat guards are placed on each line. Look at figure 7-6. To provide protection to the side of the ship while it is alongside a pier, camels (large wooden logs or rectangular structures) (views B and C) are often placed between the pier and the ship. Fenders (large cylindrical objects of rubber or fibrous material) (views A and D) are  swung  over  the  side  of  the  ship  to  give  bumper support against damage whenever a ship lies alongside another ship or a pier. 7-3 Student Notes: Figure 7-4.—A rigged accommodation ladder. Figure 7-5.—Ship’s mooring lines.



Military News
White House intruder identified as Army veteran
The man accused of getting inside the White House after...
militarytimes.com
Chinese destroyer docks in Iran, first such visit
A Chinese destroyer has docked in a southern Iranian port...
militarytimes.com
POW from Korea finally receives his decorations
Nearly six years after earning a Silver Star during close...
militarytimes.com
Air Combat Command chief reluctantly accepts Global Hawk over U-2
While the plan to keep new, unmanned Global Hawks over...
militarytimes.com
Former HM3 receives Silver Star for saving Marine's life
Former Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class (FMF/SW) Jonathan Kong waited nearly...
militarytimes.com
Joint Chiefs chairman: Arab nations needed in fight against Islamic State
The still-evolving military campaign plan to retake Iraqi territory held...
militarytimes.com
Afghan presidential candidates sign unity deal
Afghanistan's two presidential candidates signed a power-sharing deal on Sunday...
militarytimes.com
Fence jumper prompts more White House security
The Secret Service is boosting security outside the White House...
militarytimes.com
Turkey: 49 hostages have been freed in Iraq
Dozens of Turkish hostages seized by the Islamic State group...
militarytimes.com
Breedlove: Ukraine has cease-fire 'in name only'
NATO's top general said Saturday the two-week-old truce between Ukraine...
militarytimes.com
Kurdish fighters head to Syria to fight militants
Hundreds of Kurdish fighters have crossed from Turkey and Iraq...
militarytimes.com
Airmen hike Colorado's Mount Elbert for nationwide challenge
A group of cadets and airmen from the Air Force...
militarytimes.com
Buffer zone agreed on in Ukrainian peace talks
Negotiators in Ukrainian peace talks agreed early Saturday to create...
militarytimes.com
Soldiers create offshore reef using old armored vehicles
The South Carolina National Guard has found a good use...
militarytimes.com
U.S., Canadian jets intercept 8 Russian aircraft
Two F-22 fighter jets intercepted six Russian military airplanes that...
militarytimes.com
Odierno: Airstrikes tougher as militants blend in
The Army's top officer warned Friday that it will become...
militarytimes.com
U.S. troops to have no direct contact with Ebola victims
The 3,000 U.S. troops who will deploy to West Africa...
militarytimes.com
National Guard to resume September training
September weekend drills for Army National Guard soldiers are back...
militarytimes.com
Cowpens XO canned for drunken driving
The second-in-command of the cruiser Cowpens has been fired for...
militarytimes.com
Abuse scandals prompt Hagel to examine military's links to NFL
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is taking a close look at...
militarytimes.com
 


Privacy Statement - Copyright Information. - Contact Us

comments powered by Disqus

Integrated Publishing, Inc.
9438 US Hwy 19N #311 Port Richey, FL 34668

Phone For Parts Inquiries: (727) 755-3260
Google +