Quantcast ANCHOR CHAIN

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ANCHORS Anchors can be defined by their stowage locations aboard ship or by their type of construction. Bower anchors are carried on the bow and are secured (housed) in the hawsepipes. Stern anchors are carried on the stern. On landing ships and craft, stern anchors are secured to the stern and are used to help pull away from beaches. The most common types of anchors used aboard ship are the stockless and the lightweight (or stock-in-crown) anchors. The two anchors shown in figure 7-2 are of Navy design. The stockless types are used chiefly as bow anchors (bowers) on most Navy ships. Originally, the lightweight types were used only on small boats and as stern anchors of landing ships and craft. However, recently they are carried as bowers for several types of vessels. ANCHOR CHAIN Modern Navy anchor chain consists of studded links of  high  strength  steel.  (Studs  are  crosspieces  of  metal forged or welded in the center of the links to prevent the chain from kinking.) Chains are made up of 15-fathom (90-foot) sections called standard shots. The number of shots per chain depends on the size of the ship. Shots are secured together by detachable links that can be readily disassembled whenever it is desirable to break the chain. STOWING CHAIN As the chain comes aboard, it passes along the deck on metal flash plates, over the wildcat, and down into the chain locker. Each chain goes into a bin called a chain locker, as shown in figure 7-1. Its bitter end is secured to a ring bolt on the bulkhead of the chain locker. ANCHOR WINDLASSES The Navy uses two types of anchor windlasses for lifting the ship’s anchor—the vertical shaft type and the horizontal shaft type (fig. 7-3). The vertical shaft type is used on most combatant ships. The horizontal shaft type is used on amphibious and auxiliary ships. Both types are equipped with wildcats, which engage the links of the anchor chain. The wildcat may be disengaged when it  is  desired  to  use  the  capstan  (vertical  type)  or  the gypsy heads (horizontal type) for handling lines or wire. 7-2 Student Notes: Figure 7-1.—Typical ground tackle and chain stowage. Figure 7-2.—Anchors. Figure 7-3.—Horizontal shaft anchor windlass.



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