Quantcast TRAINING MANUALS AND NONRESIDENT TRAINING COURSES - 14325_482

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class of school has a particular purpose. They usually train you in a specific skill or for a particular job. The classes and their purposes are given in the following paragraphs. Class “R” Schools Class “R” schools provide general indoctrination and teach skills and knowledge in basic military subjects. You have already attended a class “R” school—recruit training. Recruit training is considered GMT as well as a class “R” school. Class “A” Schools Class   “A”   schools   provide   basic   technical knowledge and skills required to prepare you for a Navy rating and further specialized training. An example of a class “A” school is Electrician’s Mate “A” school. Class “C” Schools Class “C” schools provide you with the advanced knowledge,  skills,  and  techniques  to  perform  a particular job in a billet. A Navy enlisted classification (NEC)  code  may  be  awarded  to  identify  the  skill achieved. An example of a class “C “school would be a school on a particular type of radar system. Class “F” Schools Class “F” schools provide team training to officer and enlisted fleet personnel who normally are members of  ships’  companies.  They  also  provide  refresher training,  including  operator  and  technical  courses  of short  duration  to  meet  the  needs  of  a  fleet  or  type commander. Class “P” Schools Class “P” schools provide undergraduate education and indoctrination and basic training in fundamentals, preliminaries,  or  principles  to  midshipmen  officer candidates  and  other  newly  commissioned  officers (except  those  schools  acquired  through  class  “V” programs). The Naval Academy, Naval Reserve Officer Training  Corps  (NROTC),  and  Officer  Candidate School (OCS) are all class “P” schools. Class “V” Schools Class “V” schools provide training in the skills that lead to the designation of naval aviator or naval flight officer. Obligated Service Requirements for Schools Normally,  you  must  have  a  certain  amount  of obligated service to be eligible to attend a Navy school. The amount of obligated service required depends on the length of the school. Obligated service is counted from the time you start the school until the end of your active obligated service (EAOS) date. You may increase your  obligated  service  to  qualify  for  a  school  by agreeing  to  extend  your  enlistment  or  reenlist.  Your personnel  office  can  give  you  the  obligated  service requirement for any particular school. TRAINING MANUALS AND NONRESIDENT TRAINING COURSES A training manual (TRAMAN) provides you with basic  information  about  a  particular  rating.  You  may also use it to study for advancement examinations. The Naval   Education   and   Training   Professional Development  and  Technology  Center  (NETPDTC) publishes TRAMANs. Navy schools may use them as texts or references. They may also be used as references for  questions  in  personnel  qualification  standards (PQS),  as  texts  for  correspondence  courses,  or  as self-study    manuals.    TRAMANs    cover    the qualifications necessary for advancement by covering the material directly or by directing you to some other reference.  TRAMANs  include  general  TRAMANs, such as this text and other military requirements texts, and texts written for a specific rating, such as Equipment Operator Basics. Other TRAMANs cover a wide range of  subjects,  such  as  basic  machines,  fluid  power, blueprint reading and sketching, and leadership. The  nonresident  training  course  (NRTC)  is  a self-study,  enlisted  training  course  used  with  a TRAMAN.   Generally,   the   NRTC   is   locally administered,  which  means  your  ESO  scores  it. TRAMANs and NRTCs are usually printed in one book and referred to as a TRAMAN/NRTC. The  Catalog of Nonresident Training Courses, NAVEDTRA 12061, contains a current list of available 16-26 Student Notes:



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