Quantcast BOARDING AND LEAVING A NAVAL VESSEL - 14325_258

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If the flag is displayed when the anthem is played, you face the flag and stand at attention. If in uniform and covered, render the hand salute; if in civilian clothes or if in uniform and uncovered, you place your right hand over your heart. Persons in formation stand at attention, and those in charge of the formation salute. Outdoors With  some  exceptions,  saluting  procedures  when the anthem is played outdoors (with or without the flag displayed)  are  the  same  as  when  indoors.  Marching formations  are  halted  at  attention,  and  the  person  in charge  faces  and  salutes  the  flag  or  music,  as appropriate. Personnel in boats, whether in uniform or in civilian clothes, do not salute during the playing of the anthem. Only the boat officer (or coxswain if there is no boat officer) stands and salutes; all other personnel remain seated at attention. You  are  not  likely  to  hear  “The  Star  Spangled Banner” played in a parade, but most marching units do carry the national ensign. The rules for saluting the flag passing in a parade are simple: come to attention, face the  flag,  and  salute.  (If  you  are  in  a  vehicle,  remain seated at attention.) The  musical  selection  “Hail  to  the  Chief”  is performed to honor the President of the United States. When “Hail to the Chief” is played, stand at attention and salute. BOARDING AND LEAVING A NAVAL VESSEL You cannot just walk on and off a ship as you would enter  and  leave  your  home.  You  must  follow  certain procedures. When you are in uniform and boarding any ship and the national ensign is flying, you halt at the gangway, face aft, and salute the ensign. You then turn to the OOD and salute. If you are returning to your own ship, you say, “I request permission to come aboard, sir/ma’am.” The OOD returns both salutes and says, “Come aboard” or a similar expression. When you salute the OOD in boarding a ship other than your own, you say, “I request permission to come aboard, sir/ma’am.” You should then add the purpose of your visit: “to visit a friend” or “to go to small stores.” When  you  leave  a  ship,  the  order  of  saluting  is reversed. You salute the OOD first and say, “I request permission  to  leave  the  ship,  sir/ma’am.”  After receiving  permission,  you  then  face  and  salute  the ensign (if it is flying) and depart. If you are not in the liberty uniform, state your reason for wanting to leave the ship: “I request permission to go on the pier to check the mooring lines, sir/ma’am.” When  boarding  a  ship  in  civilian  attire  and  the national ensign is flying, you will halt at the gangway, at attention,  and  face  aft.  You  then  turn  to  the  OOD  at attention. If you are returning to your own ship, you say, “I request permission to come aboard, sir/ma’am.” The OOD  salutes  and  says,  “Very  well”  or  a  similar expression. When you board a ship other than your own, you say, “I request permission to come aboard, sir/ma’am.” You should then add the purpose of your visit. The OOD will then say, “Permission granted” or “Permission not granted.” When you are leaving a ship in civilian attire, the procedure is reversed. You stand at attention in front of the OOD first and say, “I request permission to leave the ship, sir/ma’am.” After receiving permission, you then stand at attention facing the ensign (if it is flying) and depart. Sometimes   it   is   necessary   for   destroyers, submarines, and other ships to tie up in nests alongside a repair ship, tender, or pier. In this case, you may have to cross several ships to go ashore or return to your own ship. When you have to cross one or more ships to reach the pier, to reach another ship or to return to your own ship,  you  should  use  the  following  procedure:  Upon boarding a ship that you must cross, salute the colors (if flying),  then  turn  toward  and  salute  the  OOD,  and request permission to cross. After receiving permission, proceed to cross without delay. When you depart that ship,  it  is  not  necessary  to  salute  the  colors  or  OOD again. Repeat this crossing procedure until you reach your destination. 9-14 Student Notes:



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