Quantcast Figure 7-18.Single- and double-becket bends.

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Becket Bend The chief value of the becket bend is its use in binding together two lines of different sizes. If there is a great difference in sizes or the strain on the line is to be great, always use a double becket bend. To fashion a single becket bend, you should— 1.   Make a bight in one line and run the bitter end of the other line up through it, as shown in figure 7-18, view A. 2.   Pass  the  end  around  behind  both  parts  of  the bight and back under itself (fig. 7-18, view B). Figure  7-18,  view  C,  shows  how  you  make  a double  becket  bend  by  simply  taking  another  turn around the bight. (These bends are also known as sheet bends.) Clove Hitch The clove hitch can be quickly and easily tied in several  ways,  and  it  will  hold  as  long  as  there  is  a strain on it. Once the strain is taken off, however, the hitch  must  be  checked  and  tightened  to  prevent  the bitter  end  from  pulling  out  when  the  strain  is reapplied.  To  make  this  checking  and  tightening unnecessary, you lash a clove hitch with a half hitch around the standing part. To tie this hitch (fig. 7-19), you should— 1.   Take a turn with the bitter end. 2.   Pass the end across the standing part. 3.   Take  another  turn.  (Notice  that  both  turns  go around in the same direction.) 4.   Pass  the  end  under  itself,  and  the  hitch  is complete. Another  way  to  make  this  hitch  is  to  form  two underhand loops. Lay the second loop on top of the first. This method is the usual way to form the hitch when it can be slipped over the end of the object to which the line is to be secured. Round Turn and Two Half Hitches The chief advantage of the round turn and two half hitches over other hitches is that it won’t slip along the object to which it is secured. It’s made by taking a round turn and making two half hitches (fig. 7-20). (The two half  hitches  actually  consist  of  a  clove  hitch  taken around the line itself.) 7-12 Student Notes: Figure 7-19.—Tying a clove hitch. Figure 7-18.—Single- and double-becket bends. Figure 7-17.—Tying a bowline.



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