Quantcast MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS AND DOCUMENTS

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Unlike the situation with military personnel, civilian pay is inherent to the position, rather than to the person in the position. The pay of GS, GM, and WGworkers is tied by law to the duties and responsibilities described by position classifications and job grading standards. In addition, the Department of the Navy issues classification standards and job-grading guidance for occupations and job environments not adequately covered by Office of Personnel Management (OPM) standards. These Navy standards are consistent with the grade alignments contained in OPM standards. The Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) has authorized their use in situations to which they apply. Within the Navy, authority to classify civilian positions has been delegated down through the chain of command and generally rests with commanding officers (COs). Senior and master chiefs are often required to write civilian position descriptions used by the civilian personnel office to classify the position. Detailed instructions for carrying out the classification process are given in Civilian Personnel Instructions (CPIs), chapters 511 and 532. As with military personnel, you should organize all civilian positions in such a way that the activity’s mission  can  be  accomplished  with  the  minimum grade-level  requirements. CONTRACTORS Contractors are an integral part of the Navy’s total manpower force. The Navy’s job is not to be in business. Therefore, private sources provide many of the commercial or industrial goods and services we need. One of the principal limitations on contracting of a function is whether the billet assigned to the function is required for national defense. The DCNO (Manpower, Personnel and Training) makes this determination based upon manpower data submitted in fact sheets. Activities submit fact sheets in response to the review requirements of the Navy’s Contracting-Out Plan. When the use of contractors is possible and no overriding  factors  require  in-house  performance, rigorous comparisons of contract costs versus in-house costs are made. These comparisons are then used to determine how work will be done or services will be performed. MANPOWER REQUIREMENTS AND DOCUMENTS Manpower is programmed on the basis of the manpower requirements resulting from the policies and procedures of the Navy manpower system. Manpower requirements provide the basis for the development of plans to get, train, and assign personnel. The  Navy  Manpower  Requirements  Program encompasses three subsystems. The primary purpose of these  subsystems  is  to  determine  and  document quantitative and qualitative manpower requirements for the Navy. These subsystems include the Ship Manpower Document (SMD) Program; the Squadron Manpower Document  (SQMD)  Program;  and  the  shore requirements, standards, and manpower planning system  (SHORSTAMPS). AUTHORIZATION DOCUMENTS Authorization  documents  set  forth  minimum manning requirements for ships, air squadrons, and shore stations. The CNO determines these requirements from the Navy’s required operational capabilities (ROC) and projected operational environment (POE). The Navy uses three authorization documents: Ship Manpower Document (SMD), Squadron Manpower Document (SQMD), and Shore Manpower Document (SHMD). They display in detail the manpower requirements and the rational for determination of the requirements. Manpower as shown in the manpower documents is termed organizational manning and serves as the basis for manpower authorization. Requirements are drawn from the ROC and POE. Naval Warfare Mission Areas and Required Operational Capabilities/Projected  Operational  Environment (ROC/POE) Statements (NOTAL), OPNAVINST C3501.2H, contains procedures for submitting inputs to update the ROC/POE. Required Operational Capabilities Required operational capabilities (ROCs) are those functions a command is expected to perform in carrying out the assigned mission. A ship, for example, is designed to meet an ROC, not vice versa. The ROCs for ships and squadrons are issued in Missions  and Characteristics of USN Ships and Aircraft Squadrons, NWIP 11-20. 6-7



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