Quantcast ORGANIZATIONAL   OBJECTIVES

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executive officers and above. Those officers are responsible for setting the direction and vision of the command. In short, they set the major goals the command is to accomplish. Middle management is composed of department heads. The department heads determine which elements of their department are required to meet each of the specific goals set by upper manage- ment. Department heads also assist in coordinating action between their divisions or interaction with other departments. Operating-level management is composed of division officers and chief petty officers. Personnel at that level are responsible for fulfilling the super- visory function of management. The operating level of management is responsible for taking the goals  and  determining  a  plan  of  action  to accomplish the goals. The operating level is also responsible for ensuring the workers accomplish the goals in a timely manner. The elements of management chief petty officers are involved in include planning, staffing, controlling, organizing, and leading. PLANS Plans are methods devised to achieve a goal. They are like road maps—they set the course the command will follow. All levels of management are involved in one type of planning or another. At the chief petty officer level, you will probably be involved in only one type of planning. All plans fall into one of three general groups: strategic plans, standing plans, and single-use plans. Although you will normally be involved in single-use plans,    understanding all levels of planning will help you meet your planning require- ments. Strategic Plans Strategic plans involve activities that will take place in 2 to 5 years. The type commander (TYCOM) or higher authority uses the strategic plans of an organization to set its organizational mission and objectives. The commanding officer may set additional organizational objectives such as receiving the Golden Anchor Award or pass- ing the operational propulsion plant examination (OPPE) with no discrepancies. ORGANIZATIONAL  MISSION.  —The organizational mission states the intended purpose of the command. The Ship’s/Command’s Organization and Regulation Manual (SORM) contains the organizational mission. ORGANIZATIONAL  OBJECTIVES.   Organizational objectives are long-range objec- tives. They serve as the goals for management in achieving the organizational mission. The type commander or squadron-level commanders set organizational  objectives.  You  can  find  those objectives  in  your  command’s  five-year  plan, yearly schedule, and quarterly schedule. Examples of  organizational  objectives  are  the  board  of inspection and survey (INSURV), the operational propulsion  plant  examination  (OPPE),  the operational  readiness  inspection  (ORI),  and deployment schedules. You can use those long-range objectives to assist you in planning your work center objectives. An example of a work center objective is preparing for an upcoming board of inspection and survey (INSURV) visit. As a work center supervisor, you will probably discover an upcoming inspection the month before it occurs. You could, however, find out the approximate date of the inspection 2 or more years in advance so that you could begin correcting or documenting discrepancies. That type of planning eliminates crisis management. Standing Plans Standing plans are those the Navy uses for recurring or long-range activities. They include United  States  Navy  Regulations,  1990  (Navy Regs), Standard Organization and Regulations of the U.S. Navy (SORN), SORM,  S E C N AV instructions, OPNAV instructions, captain’s night orders, technical manuals, and so forth. Chief petty officers use standing plans to determine routine work requirements within the division or work center. POLICIES.  —Policies are broad general statements  of  expected  behavior.  You  should become familiar with the command policies stated in the SORM. You could be tasked with helping the division officer develop divisional policies. Divisional policies involve areas such as the com- mand sponsor program, extra military instruction (EMI), extension of work hours, and routing of request chits. As a general rule, your division will already have division and command policy state- ments; your job is to ensure your subordinates carry out those policies. PROCEDURES. —Procedures are detailed standing plans. Procedures define the exact steps in sequence personnel should take to achieve the 3-2



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