Quantcast THE SECTION LEADER

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5-24 The  Navy  is  a   complex   organization   that   is constantly changing. There are numerous publications and instructions that the petty officer third class must consult to keep current. OPNAVINST 5400 series and the United States Government Manual printed by the Office of the Federal Register National Archives and Records Administration covers missions and functions of  Navy  commands.  Additionally  there  are  many government and Navy sites on the Internet which give general information regarding naval organization. THE SECTION LEADER Each division has a duty section leader, also called a duty representative (duty rep), who is the senior petty officer. On a small ship, you as a petty officer third class may be assigned the duties of a section leader. However, depending on the size or class of ship, you may not be assigned as a section leader until you become a second class  petty  officer.  Aboard  larger  ships  with  large sections, you may have to wait until you make first class to become a section leader. Therefore, being assigned as a section leader depends upon the size of the command and the number of personnel in your duty section. As a section leader, you will have information to report.  Always  use  the  chain  of  command.  During normal working hours you should report to your leading petty officer (LPO). If the LPO is a petty officer first class, he or she will, in turn, report to the leading chief petty officer (LCPO) or to the division officer. After normal working hours you report to your department duty officer, who reports to the command duty officer (CDO). When you are assigned as a section leader, you assume additional responsibilities for the work, conduct, appearance, and welfare of the personnel in your section. Along with these additional responsibilities, you are granted additional authority to carry out your duties properly. The section leader is the first step up the ladder of naval authority. You may be the supervisor for all the routine and special activities of  the  people  in  your section. These activities include reveille, quarters for muster, observance of the proper uniform of the day, and of items posted in the Plan of the Day or Plan of the Week.  In  addition,  you  will  be  responsible  for  the damage control functions of your duty section after normal working hours. When your duty section is being relieved, you should pass  on  to   your   relief   any   pertinent   information regarding the section. This information could involve new safety hazards or cleanliness of the ship. POLICE PETTY OFFICER Your command may have a division police petty officer (PPO). This position may be called another name such  as  compartment  petty  officer,  barracks  petty officer, and so forth, but the duties and responsibilities are the same. The PPO is usually a junior petty officer and is not part of the master-at-arms force. The PPO’s duties encompass areas such as cleanliness of divisional berthing and stowage areas, holding reveille, maintaining silence after taps, and maintaining order. In addition to these duties, PPOs  stand  their  regular  watches  and perform their normal duties. Sometimes they may be required to augment the MAA force in details such as searching the ship and provisioning for new personnel. MASTER-AT-ARMS The chief master-at-arms (CMAA), often called the sheriff,  is  responsible  to  the  executive  officer  for maintaining good order and discipline. Personnel of the Master-at-Arms (MA) rating usually fill this billet on larger ships. On ships not having a CMAA, a chief petty officer from another rating usually will be appointed by the commanding officer and will be assigned CMAA as a collateral duty. If you are not part of the MA rating and are assigned to the MAA force, your tour of duty usually will be 6 months. If you are assigned as an MAA, your job will require tact, a lot of common sense, and thorough knowledge of Navy and command regulations. Remember, an MAA is much  like  a  police  officer  and,  as  such,  must  be courteous and friendly and must enforce regulations without favor to anyone.



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