Quantcast Subsurface Ships

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Newark, a 4,098-ton protected cruiser, was the last of the  Navy’s  warships  to  be  fitted  with  sails.  It  was launched in 1890 and commissioned the following year. Because of its many improvements, the USS  Newark has been labeled as  the first modern cruiser in the U.S. Fleet. With the development of the self-propelled torpedo, long-range torpedo boats made their debut. In 1890, one of the first torpedo boats joined the fleet—the 22.5-knot USS Cushing. The Navy acquired 16 fast torpedo boats and three 185-ton boats capable of speeds of 27 knots. The development of torpedo boats caused the shape of ships to change. An example was the USS  Truxtun, which led to the design of our present-day destroyers. These ships were designed to combat torpedo boats. Later improvements resulted in destroyers themselves carrying torpedoes. Subsurface Ships Since surface ships were driven by steam, why not submarines? Steam requires air, fire, and heat, and those were in limited supply aboard a submarine. During the 19th  century,  the  internal  combustion  engine  was developed. Use of this engine on ships had drawbacks. However, many of its problems were overcome by two inventors—John Holland and Simon Lake. Holland and Lake had opposite theories about the submarine. 5-12 Figure 5-5.—Farragut (in rigging) at Mobile Bay. Student Notes:



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